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Victory for black students over Natural Hair Protest #StopRacismAtPretoriaGirlsHigh



A recent protest in South Africa is illustrating the fact that, in some cases, black hair is not just hair. On Monday, students at the Pretoria High School for Girls rallied together to protest the racism and discrimination they claim to have endured over the school year from their white teachers. 
The 200 pupils led by the Congress of South African Students were protesting aschool policy that students claim bans them from wearing their hair in its natural state. The code states that “hair must be brushed” and styles must be “conservative.” The styles the students are allegedly not allowed to wear include bantu knots, large locs, box braids and afros (aka almost every go-to protective style for black girls). 
Racist hair rules at Pretoria Girl’s High School are suspended pending an investigation,according to BBC World News.
“There will be no learner that will be victimized purely because of their hairstyle until the School Governing Body have finalized a new code of conduct that deals specifically with this issue,” said Gauteng Education MEC Panyaza Lesufi in an article for Eye Witness News.

#StopRacismAtPretoriaGirlsHigh trended as girls as young as 13 dared to take a stand.
The victory in Pretoria is a victory not only for girls in South Africa, but for every black person, because the policing of black hair is never just about hair. It’s a whitewashing of blackness in professional and educational environments. Policing our hair is a type of racism that hides in company handbooks and school codes of conduct.


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