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City Manager: Body cam video of Dubose shooting "not a good situation"



Cincinnati City Manager Harry Black announced Monday he has been told what's on the body camera video that captured the final moments of Sam Dubose before he was shot and killed by a University of Cincinnati Police Officer - and "it's not a good situation."

"Again, it's a tragic situation. Someone has died that didn't necessarily need to die and I"ll leave it at that," Black told reporters at City Hall after meeting with university officials.

"This morning, several senior leaders of the University of Cincinnati met with members of the City Manager's Advisory Group to hear their thoughts and perspectives about how best to move forward together in a spirit of cooperation and collaboration. As the result of multiple conversations this past week with community leaders, which were reiterated this morning,  the university is initiating a process to hire an independent external reviewer to examine UC Police Department policies, procedures and practices," said UC President  Santa Ono.

"We also are moving forward with the creation of a community advisory panel. These are important steps to create an enhanced environment of openness and healing," stated Ono. 

The family of Sam Dubose has retained Orlando attorney Mark O'Mara who called for the immediate release of the body camera video capturing Dubose's final moments before a University of Cincinnati police officer shot him during a traffic stop.

"Releasing the body cam video is simply the right thing to do," said O'Mara in a prepared statement. "It will provide the family with some of the answers they deserve, and it will satisfy the community's right to know."
O'Mara is a nationally known criminal defense attorney who represented George Zimmerman in the 2013 shooting death of Trayvon Martin, 17.

O'Mara and two members of his legal team are flying into the Tri-State Monday as he begins work on the case, said Shawn Vincent, spokesman for O'Mara Law Group.
On Friday, FOX19 NOW sued Hamilton County Prosecutor Joe Deters seeking the release of the video footage that could play a critical role in showing the July 19 encounter between Dubose, 43, and Officer Ray Tensing.
The Associated Press, Cincinnati Enquirer and three other local television stations joined FOX19 NOW in the lawsuit.



Attorney Jack Greiner says Deters' decision to withhold the video violates Ohio's public records laws.
Deters has refused to release the footage because he said it would hurt his investigation and could taint the grand jury process.  He said he expects to complete his investigation  and present findings to the grand jury by the end of this week.  He has said the footage will be released at some point, "just not right now."
But O'Mara maintains releasing the video will not interfere with the legal process.

"This type of tragedy has become too common. There is a troubling pattern in these police shootings, and the public has a clear interest in these cases," O'Mara said. "I know there is a concern about the officer's right to a fair trial, but I've been a criminal defense attorney for 30 years, and have tried high-profile cases, and can tell you that releasing the video will not prevent Officer Tensing from getting due process.
"Lawyers (have) been able to seat a jury in the Boston bombing case, the Aurora theater shooting and the Zimmerman case -- despite trial publicity," he said. "And what about Samuel's rights?  What about the larger social justice concerns?

"Hamilton County Prosecuting Attorney Joseph Deters has a choice regarding whether or not to disclose the video. Since Samuel's record has already been disclosed, and since the incident report and the 911 call has already been released, common sense and compassion should inform his decision about releasing the body camera footage."

The video footage is especially critical after some of the records released so far in the case appear to have major inconsistencies.

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